All properties built prior to 1980 should be considered as target housing for lead-based paint hazards. Attention all pregnant women, parents, and people with high blood-pressure, you ESPECIALLY should get this inspection! Defective peeling/flaking paint on any interior or exterior surface must be identified and repaired following the EPA guidelines. We will test for the presence of lead in the home by taking samples of paint, interior dust, and exterior soil.

Stand Alone = $135
With 101 Point Inspection = $95

epa-logo“Lead is a toxic metal that was used for many years in products found in and around our homes. Lead also can be emitted into the air from motor vehicles and industrial sources, and lead can enter drinking water from plumbing materials. Lead may cause a range of health effects, from behavioral problems and learning disabilities, to seizures and death. Children six years old and under are most at risk. Most Common Sources of Lead Poisoning are (1) Deteriorating lead-based paint  (2) Lead contaminated dust (3) Lead contaminated residential soil.” – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

 

cpsc-logo“Consider having the paint tested in homes constructed before the 1980s. This is particularly important if infants, children, or pregnant women are present. Lead-based paint is a major source of lead poisoning for children and can also affect adults. In children, lead poisoning can cause irreversible brain damage and can impair mental functioning. It can retard mental and physical development and reduce attention span. It can also retard fetal development even at extremely low levels of lead. In adults, it can cause irritability, poor muscle coordination, and nerve damage to the sense organs and nerves controlling the body. Lead poisoning may also cause problems with reproduction (such as a decreased sperm count). It may also increase blood pressure. Thus, young children, fetuses, infants, and adults with high blood pressure are the most vulnerable to the effects of lead.” – The US Consumer Product Safety Commission